Mario Hossen received his musical education in Sofia, Vienna and Paris. He made his debut as a soloist with an orchestra at the age of eight. His teachers included great pedagogues such as Michael Frischenschlager and Gérard Poulet. Mario Hossen is the artistic director of the Camerata Orphica and founder of the International Music Academy Orpheus in Vienna. Hailed for his incredible virtuosity and charismatic stage presence, Hossen plays a repertoire that ranges all the way from Renaissance music to Classic music to contemporary works and Jazz. As a concert soloist of international acclaim, Mario Hossen has performed with renowned orchestras such as the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, the English Chamber Orchestra, the Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra, the Bruckner Orchestra Linz, the Orchestra della Scala di Milano, the Royal Philharmonic, the Orquesta Sinfónica del Estado de México, the Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Sofia Philharmonic and the Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie. Hossen has performed with outstanding musicians like Bruno Canino, Vladimir Fedoseyev, Philippe Bernold, Leslie Howard, Adrian Oetiker, Gérard Causse, Roy Goodman, Vladimir Mendelssohn, Boris Mersson, Leon Bosch, Dominique de Williencourt, Georges Pludermacher and Jean-Bernard Pommier - among others. Several contemporary composers have dedicated works to Hossen and Hossen has commissioned works to com posers, such as Tomas Marco, Rainer Bischof, Walter Baer, Gheorghi Arnaoudov, Francois- Oierre Descamps and Alessandro Solbiati. Hossen’s musicological and artistic endeavors are focused among other things on source research on Niccolo Paganini. The complete oeuvre of Paganini for solo violin and for violin and orchestra will be released as a historical-critical edition by Doblinger Music Publisher Vienna. Hossen plays all concerts exclusively with his preferred strings, the Vision Titanium Solo strings manufactured by the Viennese company Thomastik-Infeld. Mario Hossen plays a violin by Giovanni Battista Guadagnini, 1749, on loan from the Austrian National Bank collection.